Do your jaw reflects a healthy eating habit?

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The problems of lack of space for teeth in the jaw, shifting or caries is a big problem specific to modern man.

Orthodontists are seeing a progressive transformation in the shape and size of the jaws of modern man. Several factors have contributed to this, including changes in feeding practices that have been changing for centuries.

The Cro-Magnon man possessed a sufficiently large and developed mouth. They used to eat with both hands and tear a raw or very uncooked food from their teeth. That strengthened its jaw and teeth. It has been found that the problems of lack of space for teeth in the jaw, shifts or caries are problems specific to the modern man whose jaws become narrow over the centuries. Some populations that have retained older feeding patterns, using simpler and, in particular, less cooked and harsher foods, still have jaws that can easily accommodate all their teeth.

Today, we are accustomed from early childhood to eat very cooked, often chopped and mixed, soft and creamy food

Today, we are accustomed from early childhood to eat very cooked, often chopped and mixed, soft and unctuous food. It is in the first years of life that the jaws are formed by stretching and molding themselves according to what we give them to chew. Eating behaviors are likely to play an essential role in oral health prevention. To improve the situation, it is absolutely necessary to make more muscular efforts by favoring the most stimulating modes of nourishment for the growth of the jaws.

The three-dimensional development of the jaws in the dental arches is largely dependent on the functional stresses. Among these functions, chewing offers a wide range of movements of the mandible and putting into action all the muscles of the face. Some are specialized in crushing food but all of the cheeks, lips, and tongue acts together to constantly replace the food bolus between the teeth.

The chewing of resistant foods requires the incorporation of lateral movements during the mastication cycle which require the widening of the arches. It is thus that the mouths of children are given every chance of having a jaw capable of holding all the teeth. For this growth to be symmetrical, it must also be chewed. Any pathology of the teeth of milk, any defect of the dental articulation can lead to an asymmetry of mastication and thus a pathological growth.

As soon as the child has his first teeth, incisors then molars of milk and canines, he must be offered meals that he must chew

As soon as the child has his first teeth, incisors then molars of milk and canines, he must be offered meals that he must chew. Milk should give way to thicker and thicker balls, then to vegetable purees, crushed with a fork, with meat or ham cut into small pieces. Crunchy fruits like apples are also cut into small portions that the child carries to the mouth itself. Even compotes can contain small pieces of fruit.

All teeth of milk being in their place, the child is quite capable of eating as an adult. There is, therefore, no reason to place it in “hack-fried steak” or “ham-chopped ham” which do not require any chewing effort. Do not hesitate to offer the children al dente vegetables cooked in small pieces, chicken drumsticks to shred and fruits to chew. Give the baguette fresh with a bar of chocolate to chew rather than soft pastries that almost go without chewing.

Simple and good eating habits associated with good nasal ventilation improve the dental situation. This is the most effective way of preventing malocclusions and dental congestion. They may limit the number of extractions before installing a device. With the learning of dental hygiene protocols, they form the basis of any prevention policy.

 

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